The 8 Best Online Tutoring Jobs of 2020

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The 8 Best Online Tutoring Jobs of 2020

Online tutoring jobs are a fast-growing sector of the education world, and it’s not as hard to break into as you might think. Whether you’re an experienced tutor hoping to grow your business or just starting out, there’s a job out there that's a fit for your expertise. From test pep to language learning, these are just some of the best options for tutors looking for online work now.

Best Overall: Chegg

Chegg

Chegg

Chegg is one of the biggest names in online tutoring, and for good reason: The company has a major presence, a history behind it, and a wide variety of subject offerings.

Although there are definitely options for tutors who want to teach more general subjects or instruct middle or high school students, it’s especially good for those who have specific expertise and want to work with college or professional students. Tutors can focus on subjects that they’re passionate and knowledgeable about and help students navigate challenging, college-level coursework.

Although the company doesn’t require most of its tutors to have teaching credentials or advanced degrees, tutors with the aforementioned experience may find themselves at an advantage when it comes to getting matched with potential students.

Pay starts at about $20 per hour and may be increased based on success, high-demand subjects, and other factors. It’s also worth noting that Chegg is open to tutors even in non-traditional subject areas—where many sites focus on core subjects, Chegg allows tutors to specialize in subjects like music, art, and other subjects not always included with other tutoring sites.

Best for College Students: Brainfuse

Brainfuse

Brainfuse

Not only does Brainfuse offer jobs for tutors in an array of subjects, including ones geared toward advanced and college students, but it also expects the best from its tutors.

K-12 education is featured on the site as well, but there’s a large segment of its tutoring jobs that are targeted at college students and their specific, often detailed needs. The site’s mission is to provide one-on-one tutoring customized to each student’s needs, with the understanding that every student (and every school they may be attending) has different abilities and standards.

Another bonus: If you’re a little camera-shy or just don’t have the most reliable internet connection, Brainfuse’s tutoring can be done all on a "virtual whiteboard," meaning that you don’t have to stress about a webcam and microphone setup.

The company’s requirements are pretty straightforward, but they do reflect the fact that they’re a little more stringent and specific than other companies might be. Tutors are required to have at least a bachelor’s degree in their chosen field, and those with prior teaching or tutoring experience are heavily preferred.

Best for High School Test Prep: PrepNow Tutoring

PrepNow

PrepNow

PrepNow is one site that focuses primarily on test prep tutoring, rather than offering it as one of many options. The company's three main subject areas are high school math, SAT prep, and ACT prep. It’s a very no-frills tutoring job with a straightforward setup.

Approved tutors are matched with students looking for help in their area of expertise, who they will work with one-on-one on a regular basis—the same students every time, rather than just whoever is online at any given time. It’s pretty close to a traditional tutoring job for test prep, just online instead of in-person.

The same no-frills approach is present in the details of the job. Tutors are required to have at least two years of teaching and/or tutoring experience, as well as a minimum of a bachelor’s degree (though a teaching degree is not required) and a composite 28 on the ACT or a 650 on the SAT Math and SAT Verbal/CR. Although scheduling is flexible, every tutor must commit to at least six hours per week.

Best for College Test Prep: TutorMe

TutorMe

TutorMe

The tutoring options at TutorMe include much more than just test prep, but for tutors who specialize in that field, the site is one of the best online platforms to find work.

TutorMe has plenty of availability for tutors to work with high school students on the major standardized tests, the SAT and ACT, as well as the SAT II subject tests. It’s not just for high school tutors, though: The site offers tutoring for college and graduate entrance exams such as the MCAT, GRE, and LSAT. For experienced instructors looking for a more flexible schedule, you can’t go wrong here.

Rates are very competitive, starting at about $16 per hour, with the potential for bonuses down the line. Becoming a tutor with the company is pretty straightforward, but does require some specific qualifications, including prior teaching or tutoring experience.

All tutors must at least be enrolled at an accredited university, and those with at least a bachelor’s degree are preferred in the competitive application process. Tutors experienced in test prep who don’t want to work with in-person companies are likely to be a perfect fit.

Best for Language Tutoring: Skooli

Skooli

Skooli

Skooli isn’t just for language tutoring—it offers a broad range of tutoring gigs in subjects from K-12 up through college. But if you’re a language tutor, there are some great options.

The variety of language selections is the key to Skooli’s success. Where the majority of tutoring jobs for English-speaking tutors are geared toward teaching English to foreign students, Skooli also has options for tutors in other languages, namely, Spanish, French, and Chinese. ESL tutors are also welcome, but they’re not the only option.

Skooli does tend to pay higher rates than some of the other major online tutoring platforms (around $25 per hour), but the pay comes with some higher requirements.

The company strongly prefers teachers with at least a bachelor’s degree in the field they’re interested in tutoring, a teaching license, and/or a specialized or professional certification (like TESOL for ESL teachers, and so on). There’s also the option to become a "verified" tutor, which also includes a background check, but provides extra benefits and resources.

Best for English Tutoring: VIPKID

VIPKID

VIPKID

VIPKID is one of the biggest names in English tutoring for Chinese students and is an equally huge market for tutoring.

Instructors are assigned to work with students in half-hour blocks, which are booked up for one-on-one work rather than group sessions. All you need is a bachelor’s degree (and not necessarily in education or English). However, it's important to note that the company does strongly prefer tutors who already have some teaching or tutoring experience.

There’s no need for English-speaking tutors to worry about teaching kids who don’t share their first language: VIPKID’s tutoring is full-English immersion, so there’s no requirement to speak Chinese or any other language.

It’s a straightforward job that minimizes the stress on tutors: Lesson plans come pre-made, and tutors can have as many or as few hours as they want, at whatever times work for them.

Best for New Tutors: Tutor.com

Tutor.com

Tutor.com

If you’re relatively new to the tutoring game but have some expertise to share, Tutor.com may just be the option you’re looking for.

The company's tutoring jobs include the usual suspects—science, math, writing—but they also have a frequently updated list of more specialty subjects that are in-demand, which may include art history, managerial accounting, individual programming languages, and more.

Experienced teachers are welcome, of course, but the primary requirement for tutoring most subjects is a bachelor’s degree and a subject matter expertise test. Even current college students can get in on the ground floor, though, tutoring lower-level or more general subjects.

Just because it’s open to newer tutors, however, doesn’t mean it’s a site without a strong reputation behind it. The platform is part of the Princeton Review family, a staple in the education world, so tutors can be assured that they’re working for a reputable and well-reviewed company. New tutors looking to ease their way into the job may appreciate Tutor.com’s flexible hours: Tutors must commit to a minimum of five hours of availability per week.

Best for One-Off Help: Studypool

Studypool

StudyPool

New tutors may appreciate the unusual setup of Studypool, which allows tutors who are early in their career to build some experience in a lower-pressure setting.

Instead of being paired up for one-on-one tutoring or "class" sessions, tutors work with students on individual questions or assignments. Tutors can select questions, quote a price, and provide a turnaround time, and if the student accepts, the tutoring session begins. Rates can be higher than other sites since they’re set by the tutors, but the site does take a percentage of earnings.

New tutors may need to be cautious when bidding on questions to ensure that students are actually seeking a tutor’s assistance, rather than trying to get someone to simply do the work for them.

For tutors who are willing to pay attention, though, tutoring based on individual questions and assignments may work well as a low-commitment, flexible way to get some experience. Being able to set your own prices—and see what rates students are willing to pay—is another bonus for tutors to learn and build their businesses.

How We Chose the Best Online Tutoring Jobs

We’ve tried to include a wide variety of tutoring jobs, highlighting some of the most popular subjects and niches, including test prep and language tutoring. Major names in education, such as Chegg, appear on this list by virtue of their high profile. For its wide variety, the company earned the title of best overall on our list.

Since we know that not all tutors are looking for the same kind of work, we’ve also included a couple of unconventional, assignment-based platforms along with the more traditional tutoring-by-the-hour jobs like Studypool and Tutor.com. Of course, all prospective tutors should screen individual jobs—and individual clients—for any concerns and priorities.

What Is an Online Tutor?

An online tutor is someone who provides tutoring via online platforms. The most common options are videoconferencing, voice calls, or chat support, and most platforms use some combination of all three. Virtual tutoring jobs may have flexible hours or scheduled meetings, but most are still one-on-one work, like traditional tutoring.

How Much Do Online Tutoring Jobs Pay?

The rates for online tutoring jobs vary widely, just like traditional tutors. For the most part, online tutors have hourly rates of roughly $14 to $25, depending on the level of experience and the demand for the subject. A few platforms do allow tutors to set their own rates, but it’s important to remain competitive in order to attract clients.

Do I Need to Be Certified for an Online Tutoring Job?

Most online tutoring jobs do not require a specific certification or degree, but they require some form of experience and education. Current college students may take some online tutoring jobs, but many others require a bachelor’s degree at a minimum, as well as experience teaching or tutoring previously. Tutoring in some fields, such as ESL, may require further specialized certifications.

What Are the Requirements Needed to Become an Online Tutor?

Requirements vary between individual jobs, but in general, some university experience is required for even entry-level tutoring jobs. Many need tutors to have a bachelor’s degree (though not necessarily a teaching degree), and some require prior tutoring experience. For higher-level or professional subjects, field experience may be preferred.