How To Find Cleaning Jobs

Get advice and tips on how to find cleaning jobs and freelance gigs

woman cleans counter in home
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When you don’t have much work experience or college education, cleaning and custodial services are in-demand occupations to consider. Many employers provide on-the-job training, there are minimal educational requirements, the hours are flexible, and there are opportunities to advance to a position as a team leader or to a managerial role as you gain experience.

Key Takeaways

  • The job outlook for cleaners is strong, with many projected openings. 
  • For most cleaning positions, experience isn’t required, and employers are willing to train applicants.
  • A resume may not be required to apply, but having one can bolster your application.
  • Being available to work flexible hours will be an asset when you’re job searching.

Types of Cleaning Jobs

Some cleaners are self-employed and offer their cleaning services directly to private households or businesses. Others work for cleaning agencies or directly for companies.

For example, there are agencies that hire cleaners to work on teams to clean homes and businesses. Hotels, restaurants, hospitals, airports, and other organizations with large facilities have cleaning and janitorial workers on staff.

In addition to general cleaning jobs, there are also specialized cleaning roles such as car detailing or carpet cleaning.

Cleaning Job Titles

Here are some of the typical job titles for cleaning occupations: 

  • Building Custodian
  • Car Detailer
  • Carpet Cleaner
  • Chambermaid
  • Cleaner
  • Cleaning Crew Team Member
  • Commercial Cleaner 
  • Custodial Worker
  • Custodian
  • Environmental Services Worker
  • Floor Technician
  • Guest Room Attendant
  • Housekeeper
  • Janitor
  • Laundry Attendant
  • Maid
  • Pressure Washer
  • Residential Cleaner
  • Restroom Attendant
  • Swimming Pool Service Technician
  • Window Cleaner

Job Description

Responsibilities vary based on the job, but most positions that involve maintaining private households or commercial establishments will include the following duties:

  • Clean rooms and offices
  • Clean restrooms
  • Dust, sweep, mop, and vacuum 
  • Clean windows, walls, and glass
  • Make beds
  • Replenish linens
  • Do laundry
  • Empty trash
  • Check stock levels and order supplies

The ability to work a flexible schedule is a plus because some positions require evening and weekend hours.

Job Requirements

While some positions may prefer or require a high school diploma or equivalent, most cleaning roles don’t have education requirements, and work experience isn’t typically required. Many employers provide on-the-job training for cleaning staff.

Depending on the employer, you may need to pass a background check to get hired.

Salary and Benefits

The pay for cleaning jobs varies by role. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the median hourly wage for maids and housekeeping cleaners is $13.84 per hour. It’s $14.31 an hour for janitors and building cleaners.

Employees of large institutions such as universities and hospitals are typically provided with company benefits, including health insurance and paid time off. Smaller employers may also offer benefits packages

In locations where cleaners are in high demand, sign-on bonuses are used by companies to encourage candidates to apply. If a bonus is offered, it will be noted in the job posting.

Employment Outlook

Cleaning jobs have a good job outlook, with high projections for growth. For maids and housekeeping cleaners, there is an 11% projected increase in expected employment between 2020 and 2030, which is much higher than average. Janitors and cleaners have a 6% projected increase.

Employers That Hire Cleaners

Some of the organizations that hire cleaners include cleaning agency services, hospitality employers (hotels, restaurants, and entertainment facilities), government agencies, private institutions (including colleges, hospitals, and health care facilities), and large employers such as airports, manufacturing plants, and companies with corporate campuses and office facilities.

How To Find Cleaning Job Listings

You can find cleaning job openings quickly and easily by searching online. Many companies also post listings on their company websites. To get cleaning gigs as a freelancer, you will most likely need to advertise your services. 

Here are some ways to find job listings.

Use CareerOneStop

Search by state or review openings by company.

Check Google

Simply search Google for the types of jobs you’re interested in (cleaner jobs, housekeeper jobs, janitor jobs, etc.) to get a list of job openings in your location.

Use the Best Job Sites

Use the top job sites to find positions that meet your criteria. For a more specific list of openings, you can use advanced search options to refine your search to a specific location or type of position.

Find Large Employers

Search DirectEmployers to access job postings at major corporations. 

Find Jobs on Company Websites

Visit the career websites of organizations in your location to apply directly for staff cleaning and maintenance positions.

Get Gigs

The following sites are options for advertising cleaning services or for applying for gigs:

  • Care.com: Apply for jobs or offer your services.
  • Craigslist: Post a small biz or household services ad (the current fee is $5 per post).
  • Nextdoor: Create a business page.
  • Facebook: Create a page for your business.

Tips for Getting Hired

Even though you don’t need experience for most cleaning positions, be sure to list it on your job applications if you have it. 

In many cases, you won’t need a resume to apply, but it can’t hurt to have one ready to share with prospective employers. If you haven’t written a resume before or need to refresh yours, here’s how to get started writing a resume that will help you get hired.

When you’re interviewing, you don’t need to wear formal attire, but you should dress neatly and tidily. Wearing business casual attire will help you make the best impression.

Are you interviewing for a housekeeping job? Here are tips for how to prepare, some sample interview questions, and questions to ask your interviewer.

Follow up your interview with a thank-you note or email to reiterate your interest in the job and to show your appreciation for being considered for the position.

Article Sources

  1. CareerOneStop. "Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners."

  2. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Janitors and Building Cleaners: Work Environment."

  3. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners."

  4. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Janitors and Building Cleaners."

  5. Craigslist. "About | Help | Posting Fees."