Management Jobs: Options, Job Titles, and Descriptions

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Regardless of industry, the ability to effectively manage others and motivate excellent work is one of the greatest skills you can have in the professional world. There are a number of jobs you can do as a manager. Read on to learn more about various management job titles and responsibilities.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, hiring employees at the management level is expected to grow by 7% from 2018 to 2028.

Managers are typically well-paid and possess a significant amount of company and/or industry experience.

Often, managers are groomed from entry level positions and are, in time, promoted to be managers.

Management Job and Education Requirements

Education requirements for getting a manager job or promotion vary, depending on the level of leadership. For example, there are middle managers and supervisors, both of which may not necessarily require a college degree. However, they doubtless require significant technical skills which may accompany vocational certifications or licensing in that industry.

For executives (which are the top-tier managers), most have at least a bachelor’s degree and also a graduate degree in their related field.

Middle managers require strong problem-solving skills, as they work to implement the strategy outlined by senior management (executives). People in middle management might oversee an entire department or a large team within a department. Most middle managers are required to have a bachelor’s degree of some kind. However, if you’ve grown within the company and do not have a college degree, they may be willing to pay for your college education.

Direct supervisors manage employees. They're responsible for making sure work is done on time and correctly. They also inform middle management of any issues and set an example for employees. Do you want people to show up on time? A supervisor (especially one who infallibly shows up on time) can make a difference. 

Supervisors are perhaps less often required to possess a college degree. However, they may have difficulty getting promoted to middle management without one.

Management Job Titles

Nearly every industry requires managers. Here are among the most popular, in-demand managers in the United States, with job descriptions and median salaries.

Administrative Services ManagerAdministrative services managers plan and coordinate services for the company, such as organizing meetings, managing mail distribution, and providing office upkeep. They maintain the facility and manage the office's regular needs. 

Additional job titles for this position include:

  • Office Manager
  • Administrative Director
  • Facilities Manager
  • Administrative Officer
  • Business Manager
  • Business Administrator

Computer Information Systems ManagerIT managers determine the technological needs of the company and plan on how to meet those needs. From developing infrastructure to coordinating software updates, IT managers ensure the company and its employees are working at full capacity. Additionally, the manager determines if there are any weaknesses in the system, such as outdated programs or overloaded servers, to determine if there are any security threats.

Additional job titles for this position include:

  • IT Manager
  • IT Director
  • Project Manager
  • Application Development Director
  • Technical Services Manager
  • Computing Services Director
  • MIS Director
  • IS Director
  • IS Manager
  • IS Supervisor

Construction Manager: Managers involved in construction oversee building and trade-related projects. They may be involved in project planning, structural development, building, restoration, and renovations. Construction managers are seen building homes in a new subdivision, breaking ground on downtown skyscrapers, restoring historically-significant buildings, or maintaining roads and bridges.

Additional job titles for this position include:

  • Project Manager
  • Foreman
  • Construction Area Manager
  • Project Superintendent
  • General Contractor Manager
  • Project Executive

Food Services Manager: Food service managers handle the daily operations of restaurants or hotels in the hospitality industry. They make sure there is enough inventory for meals, adequate staff to handle busy periods, and ensure that customers are satisfied with both the food and the restaurant's service.

Additional job titles for this position include:

  • Banquet Manager
  • Restaurant Manager
  • General Manager
  • Catering Manager
  • Food & Beverage Director
  • Kitchen Manager
  • Food Service Manager
  • Food Service Director
  • Food Service Supervisor

Medical & Health Services Manager: Medical services managers (such as those in a doctor's office) manage daily operations, such as overseeing scheduling, office expenses, doctor availability, and medical benefits. Managers need to understand and stay ahead of medical regulations or laws that affect healthcare access. 

Additional job titles for this position include:

  • Program Manager
  • Clinical Director
  • Practice Administrator
  • Health Information Management Director
  • Nursing Director
  • Nursing Manager
  • Health Manager

Marketing Manager: Advertising and marketing managers create new campaigns and manage staff to execute plans. From managing teams leading the design to handling vendor outreach to distribute ads, the manager is responsible for the campaign's success. 

Additional job titles for this position include:

  • Advertising Manager
  • Promotions Manager
  • Account Supervisor
  • Product Manager
  • Brand Manager
  • Project Manager
  • Marketing Director
  • Business Development Manager
  • Commercial Lines Manager
  • Content Marketing Director
  • Content Marketing Manager
  • Director of Inbound Marketing
  • Director of Public Relations
  • Communications Director

Sales Manager: Sales managers often work closely with marketing managers in an effort to meet potential buyers and persuade them to buy a company’s products or services. They manage a team of telemarketers or perform direct sales in a region of the country. Their pay is often performance based: that is, in addition to a base salary, they are paid by commission on the amount of products/services that they and their team sells.

Additional job titles for this position include:

  • Store Manager
  • District Sales Manager
  • Sales Supervisor
  • Sales Director

Training & Development Manager: Often working within the human resources department, training and development managers are concerned with onboarding new employees, talent acquisition, and talent development. The company depends upon these managers to keep the workforce fresh and up-to-date with the latest software and best practices in their industry.

Additional job titles for this position include:

  • Human Resources Manager
  • Director of Human Resources
  • Development Manager
  • Training Manager
  • Education & Development Manager
  • Learning Manager

Executive: A company’s executives are the most important leadership roles of the company. They are the highest-paid and senior-most decision makers. Executives usually answer to the business owner, shareholders, or (if they are the only owner/shareholder) themselves.

Salary: The median salary for an executive is $104,980 with the top 25% earning over $200,000 a year.

Additional job titles for this position include:

  • Chief Executive Officer (CEO)
  • Chief Financial Officer (CFO)
  • Chief Marketing Officer (CMO)
  • Vice President
  • President