Military Medical Standards - Skin Conditions

Skin and Cellular Tissues

DERMATOLOGY CONSULTATION MAN
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Skin is considered biggest organ of the body, however, not surprisingly, there are many ailments that occur on the skin that can be disqualifying for military service. From tattoos on certain body parts, major burns, plantar warts, to dermatitis and psoriasis, skin conditions have been preventing people from serving throughout history.  Typically, any ailment on the skin or otherwise, if it prevents the use and proper wearing of safety equipment (HAZMAT, Helmet, Body Armor, etc), disqualification from service is imminent.

Not Physically Qualified (NPQ) is the acronym given to those who do not medically qualify for certain professions in the military (like Pilot - vision) or for entering the service at all. 

NPQ - Skin Causes

The causes for rejection for appointment, enlistment, and induction (without an approved waiver) are an authenticated history of:

Severe Acne

Current diseases of sebaceous glands to include severe acne, if the extensive involvement of the neck, shoulders, chest, or back is present or would be aggravated by or interfere with the proper wearing of military equipment, are disqualifying . Applicants under treatment with system retinoids, including, Accutane are disqualified until 8 (eight) weeks after completion of therapy.

Dermatitis

Dermatitis, also known as eczema, is an inflammation of the skin that results in a visible rash and itchiness. Current or history of atopic dermatitis or eczema after the 9th birthday is disqualifying.

Current or history of contact dermatitis, especially involving materials used in any type of required protective equipment, is disqualifying.

Cysts

  1. Current cysts, (other than pilonidal cysts) of such a size or location as to interfere with the proper wearing of military equipment is disqualifying.
  2. Current pilonidal cysts, if evidenced by the presence of a tumor mass or a discharging sinus is disqualifying. Surgically resected pilonidal cyst that is symptomatic, unhealed, or less than 6 months post-operative is disqualifying.

    Current or history of bullous dermatoses, including, but not limited to dermatitis herpetiformis, pemphigus, and epidermolysis bullosa, is disqualifying.

    Current chronic lymphedema is disqualifying.

    Current localized types of fungus infections, interfering with the proper wearing of military equipment or the performance of military duties, are disqualifying.

    Current or history of furunculosis or carbuncle, if extensive, recurrent, or chronic is disqualifying.

    Current or history of severe hyperhidrosis of hands or feet is disqualifying.

    Current or history of congenital or acquired anomalies of the skin such as nevi or vascular tumors that interfere with function, or are exposed to constant irritation are disqualifying. History of Dysplastic Nevus Syndrome is disqualifying.

    Current or history of keloid formation,  if the tendency is marked or interferes with the proper wearing of military equipment, is disqualifying. l. Current lichen planus is disqualifying. m. Current or history of neurofibromatosis (von Recklinghausen’s disease) is disqualifying.

    History of photosensitivity, including, but not limited to any primary sun-sensitive condition, such as polymorphous light eruption or solar urticaria; any dermatosis aggravated by sunlight such as lupus erythematosus is disqualifying.

    Current or history of psoriasis is disqualifying.

    Current or history of radiodermatitis is disqualifying.

    Scars and Burns

    Current scars, or any other chronic skin disorder of a degree or nature that requires frequent outpatient treatment or hospitalization, which in the opinion of the certifying authority affects thermoregulatory function, or will interfere with the wearing of military clothing or equipment, or which exhibits a tendency to ulcerate, or interferes with the satisfactory performance of duty, are disqualifying. Includes scars at skin graft donor or recipient sites.

    Scars at skin graft donor or recipient sites will include an evaluation of not only the relative total size of the burn wound  but also the measurable effects of the wound, the location of the wound and the risk of subsequent injury related to the wound itself.

      but also the measurable effects of the wound, the location of the wound and the risk of subsequent injury related to the wound itself.

    Prior burn injury (to include donor sites) involving a total body surface area of 40 percent or more is disqualifying.

    Prior burn injury involving less than 40 percent total body surface area, which results in a loss or degradation of thermoregulatory function is disqualifying. An examination will focus on the depth of the burn, anatomic location (extensive burns on the torso will most significantly impair heat dissipation), and destruction of sweat glands.

    Prior burn injury susceptible to trauma or resulting in functional impairment to such a degree as to interfere with the satisfactory performance of military duty, due to decreased range of motion, strength, or agility due to burn wound/ scarring is disqualifying.

    Current or history of extensive scleroderma is disqualifying.

    Some tattoo placement and those that are otherwise prohibited under applicable military regulations are disqualifying.

    Current history of chronic or recurrent urticaria is disqualifying.

    Current symptomatic plantar wart(s) is disqualifying.

    More About Military Medical Health Requirements

    Derived from Department of Defense (DOD) Directive 6130.3, "Physical Standards for Appointment, Enlistment, and Induction," and DOD Instruction 6130.4, "Criteria and Procedure Requirements for Physical Standards for Appointment, Enlistment, or Induction in the Armed Forces."