7 Tips to Help Millennials Climb the Corporate Ladder

Millennial employees discuss career success with their employer.
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One of the most efficient and secure ways to climb the corporate ladder is to do it within one's current company. However, as reported by Forbes, 91% of millennials plan to stay at one employer for less than three years. The strategy may sound like an old-fashioned career approach, but it can still pay off big time. These seven tips show how to rise from within.

Position Yourself

Chances to rise and shine always abound, especially in startups. But when opportunity knocks, it doesn't do so for long. To get noticed and be ready to take advantage, you have to position yourself as someone who wants to grow within the company. Communicating your ambition to management will allow you to be considered when an opportunity comes up.

Be a Learner

Truly good leaders are constantly learning. They’re the first to tell you that they don’t know everything, and often the more they learn the less they feel they know. As a result, they're more open to educating themselves, and that’s when real growth takes place.

Read everything you can about your field and your company's industry. Set your sights high and never limit yourself to a given current title; it'll enable you to learn more and your work to achieve greater impact. As a result, you'll be prepared when higher-level positions open up because your skills and knowledge will have expanded.

Let Your Work Speak for Itself

When it comes to growth within your company, you should never sell yourself. Rather, your work—and your character—should say everything.

This kind of commitment is what ultimately gets you noticed. For leaders looking to promote employees, identifying standouts is easier than you think because the most eligible candidates do everything with excellence. This excellence extends from work to professional conduct to everyday behavior.

Understand That No Task Is Below You

“That’s not my job” should never be in your vocabulary. A can-do attitude is essential to furthering a career. Never neglect your own tasks, but if you see that someone was overloaded or could use an extra hand with a task, dig in and offer to help. It's essential for leaders to see you going beyond the scope of your own position in order to recognize you as a collaborator who wants to grow your role, be an ally to fellow employees and encourage cohesion.

Pay Attention to Numbers

Statistics, quantifiable results, and numbers are important. Metrics matter. Data can shed a unique light on a trend. They can indicate what’s working, or conversely can help to alert you to an impending hiccup or even full-on disaster.

If a specific number keeps dropping, for example, you can nip the problem in the bud, allowing you to get on top of issues before they start. In so doing, you can steer clear of potential pitfalls and keep your teams going in the right direction.

Communicate Clearly

It’s crucial to be considerate when communicating with others, but that doesn’t mean you have to skirt around subjects or not say what you really mean. Growing in a company requires clear communication—with your boss, your team, and your co-workers. That makes it easier for everyone else to deliver and do the best job they can, setting the entire organization up for success.

Play-Well With Others

At the end of the day, you have to have a belief and sincere investment in teamwork. Company leaders notice if someone has an ability to break down barriers and connect people. Try to understand what people in each position within the organization need in order to succeed, and see how you can be a facilitator to meet those needs.

It's easy to assume you need to change employers to advance. But before you jump ship, evaluate the opportunities that you have to grow within your own organization. If your company is amenable to promoting from within, and you know how to leverage your chances, let your current investment in the place work to your advantage. You might find that you can travel the farthest by staying close to home.