New Job Announcement: Email Message and Letter Examples

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Are you excited about the new job you just got hired for and want to announce it to everyone you know? You also have a professional responsibility to alert your team members and/or clients to this rising move so that they will have time to adjust. Here's the best way to share the news.

Timing Is Crucial

First of all, don't mention your new job until your job offer is confirmed, you have a start date, you’ve signed the dotted line on your hiring contract, and it's a done deal. It's not a good idea to announce anything until you are absolutely sure it's going to happen. Employers have been known to retract job offers, or something else may happen where the job doesn't work out.

What to Write

What you say in your letter or email message depends on who you're writing to. You could tell your coworkers how much you have enjoyed working with them and how much you'll miss them, even though you are thrilled with your new position.

Your messages to clients and business contacts should be brief and include the basics – the fact that you are moving on and where you can be reached. When telling your connections, mention how pleased you are to be starting your new job. If any of your contacts helped with your job search, this is a good time to thank them for their assistance.

In all cases, keep the tone of your message positive even if you're leaving because of problems at work or with the company. There's no point in bringing up anything negative regarding your departure.

In general, your letter should include these facts:

  • You're leaving your current job
  • When you are leaving
  • What your new position will be
  • When you start the new job
  • How much you're looking forward to your new role
  • How to stay connected (share email, phone, LinkedIn, social media information)

The following will be specific to the person you're writing to:

  • Thanks for the opportunities at the old job 
  • You'll miss the person
  • Thanks for the help in securing the new job
  • How your transition will impact the client relationship 

Delivering the Announcement

Email or a LinkedIn message are both appropriate for announcing a position or career change. However, if you want to make a more formal announcement, consider sending a letter, note, or card with your new contact information.

It's a good idea to discuss how you should tell your current company's clients with your manager before you send an announcement to be sure you're both on the same page. It will also preclude any confidentiality issues if you have signed an agreement. If you signed a non-disclosure agreement (NDA) that included a clause that client lists are confidential and the property of your employer, then you could potentially open yourself to legal action should you yourself attempt to contact a current or former client to inform them of your career change.

New Job Announcement Email Message Sample

Subject: Moving On - Your Name

I am happy to announce that I will be joining the public relations department of National Media Services on January 3rd. I will be leaving my position at Western States Marketing as of December 16th.

I am grateful for the four years I spent working for Western States, and this new position will allow me to focus on social media marketing, which is my area of expertise.

The saddest part will be how much I will miss you as a client. However, it’s comforting to know that my colleague, Barry Anderson, will take over my accounts, and so you will be in good hands.

Thank you so much for trusting me with your marketing needs and if I can ever be of help to you in the future, please let me know.

Sincerely, 

Your Name

Your Phone Number

Your Email Address

More New Job Announcement Templates and Examples

The following is a list of email messages and letters you can use to announce your new job to colleagues, clients, and business and personal connections.

By taking the time to notify your peers, business associates, and clients about your acceptance of a new position, you can effectively maintain and strengthen your professional network – a continuing asset that can both provide resources to help you excel in your new role or, in a worst-case scenario, serve as a safety net if your new job fails to work out and you must seek alternate opportunities.