Punitive Articles of the UCMJ - Fraudulent Enlistment or Separation

Article 83 - Fraudulent enlistment, appointment, or separation

Military to Civilian
••• gettys

Typically, if you get kicked out of the military for fraudulent enlistment, it means you intentionally, or accidently, hid details from your past or current condition / status from the military upon entering service during the recruiting process. Often these type of UCMJ violations are the following:
1 - Medical disqualifications hidden from the recruiter. If you do not disclose the full details of your medical record to the recruiter and Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS), you will likely be removed from the military if further review of your record is required. Instances like ADD / ADHD medication, childhood asthma, congenital defects, or serious illnesses can be disqualifying or at least require a medical waiver to join. By not disclosing these medical issues, you could be disqualified from further service and kicked out of the military.

2 - Moral / Legal Issues - If arrested from serious crimes / felonies as a juvenile that were expunged (removed from record) and not disclosed, nor tried to obtain a waiver, you could be violating Article 83 of the UCMJ.

3 - Drug use - If in the past, you used drugs but told the military you never tried drugs before, you can enter the military - even if that is a lie, though you may be caught. However, in the future, if you apply for top secret clearance and the military questions family members and friends about your past, you could be caught in an Article 83 lie / omission and subject to punishment under the UCMJ.

An Article 83 Violation is used if “Any person who—

(1) procures his own enlistment or appointment in the armed forces by knowingly false representation or deliberate concealment as to his qualifications for that enlistment or appointment and receives pay or allowances thereunder; or

(2) procures his own separation from the armed forces by knowingly false representation or deliberate concealment as to his eligibility for that separation;

shall be punished as a court-martial may direct.”

Elements.

(1) Fraudulent enlistment or appointment.

  • (a) That the accused was enlisted or appointed in an armed force;

(b) That the accused knowingly misrepresented or deliberately concealed a certain material fact or facts regarding qualifications of the accused for enlistment or appointment;

(c) That the accused’s enlistment or appointment was obtained or procured by that knowingly false representation or deliberate concealment; and

(d) That under this enlistment or appointment that accused received pay or allowances or both.

(2) Fraudulent separation.

  • (a) That the accused was separated from an armed force;

(b) That the accused knowingly misrepresented or deliberately concealed a certain material fact or facts about the accused’s eligibility for separation; and

(c) That the accused’s separation was obtained or procured by that knowingly false representation or deliberate concealment.

Explanation.

(1) In general. A fraudulent enlistment, appointment, or separation is one procured by either a knowingly false representation as to any of the qualifications prescribed by law, regulation, or orders for the specific enlistment, appointment, or separation, or a deliberate concealment as to any of those disqualifications. Matters that may be material to an enlistment, appointment, or separation include any information used by the recruiting, appointing, or separating officer in reaching a decision as to enlistment, appointment, or separation in any particular case, and any information that normally would have been so considered had it been provided to that officer.

(2) Receipt of pay or allowances. A member of the armed forces who enlists or accepts an appointment without being regularly separated from a prior enlistment or appointment should be charged under Article 83 only if that member has received pay or allowances under the fraudulent enlistment or appointment. Acceptance of food, clothing, shelter, or transportation from the government constitutes receipt of allowances. However, whatever is furnished the accused while in custody, confinement, arrest, or other restraint pending trial for fraudulent enlistment or appointment is not considered an allowance. The receipt of pay or allowances may be proved by circumstantial evidence.

(3) One offense. One who procures one’s own enlistment, appointment, or separation by several misrepresentations or concealment as to qualifications for the one enlistment, appointment, or separation so procured, commits only one offense under Article 83.

Lesser included offense . Article 80—attempts

Maximum punishment.

(1) Fraudulent enlistment or appointment. Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and confinement for 2 years.

(2) Fraudulent separation. Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and confinement for 5 years.